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Water In Your Union, MO Home's Basement?

11/9/2017 (Permalink)

Water Damage Water In Your Union, MO Home's Basement? Water Damage in basement Franklin County, MO

What To Do If You Find Water In The Basement

One of the worst nightmares for any Union, MO homeowner is finding water in the basement, and in most cases, the only way to deal with such a situation is to bring in a professional. Excess water, especially when it is contaminated, has the potential to cause a great deal of damage, and if the problem is not dealt with properly, the situation can quickly get out of hand. This is especially true when water is pooling in the home and coming in contact with organic materials like drywall or fabric.

Water in the basement can be caused by a lot of factors. The room may sit under the water table, which will slowly push water into the home. A disaster like a flood can quickly fill the room with fluid, as well as a burst pipe or other plumbing mishap. No matter what causes the water to build up in the home, it will take a certified team to remove it and restore the basement effectively.

There are a couple steps, though, that a homeowner can take to minimize damage and make the home safe to navigate through. If a pipe burst or is leaking, then cutting off the supply line into the home can halt the problem. Also, switching off the home’s power may be necessary, as an electrical discharge can make walking through water exceedingly dangerous and cause a fire.

Safety is the primary concern when contending with excess moisture, and a certified crew will be able to get the home restored in while avoiding any dangerous situations.

Learn more about SERVPRO of Franklin County's water damage restoration specialists here, or contact us for immediate help 24/7.

Thanksgiving Dinner Safety Tips

11/1/2017 (Permalink)

 

Did you know that Thanksgiving is the leading day for fires involving cooking equipment, with 3 times the average number?

 Here are some tips to help keep your family and home safe this Thanksgiving:

  • Stay in the kitchen when you are cooking on the stovetop so you can keep an eye on the food.

  • Stay in the home when cooking your turkey and check on it frequently.

  • Keep children away from the stove. The stove will be hot and kids should stay 3 feet away.

  • Make sure kids stay away from hot food and liquids. The steam or splash from vegetables, gravy or coffee could cause serious burns.

  • Keep the floor clear so you don’t trip over kids, toys, pocketbooks or bags.

  • Keep knives out of the reach of children.

  • Be sure electric cords from an electric knife, coffee maker, plate warmer or mixer are not dangling off the counter within easy reach of a child.

  • Keep matches and utility lighters out of the reach of children — up high in a locked cabinet.

  • Never leave children alone in room with a lit a candle.

  • Make sure your smoke alarms are working. Test them by pushing the test button.

Remember, if the unthinkable does happen: We understand you may be feeling confused, stressed, and more than a little vulnerable. Our technicians will treat your family with empathy and your home with great care. Until help arrives, please refer to our Fire Damage Tips—Until Help Arrives Guide and follow these tips to protect yourself and your property.

SERVPRO of Franklin County is locally owned and operated and we are proud to be part of Franklin County, MO. We are also part of a national network of over 1,650 Franchises with special Disaster Recovery Teams placed strategically throughout the country to respond to large-scale fire, water, and storm disasters.

Faster To Any Size Disaster

11/1/2017 (Permalink)

General Faster To Any Size Disaster Cooking safety

November—when cooler temperatures arrive, the leaves change, and family-oriented get-togethers, like Thanksgiving, begin the holiday season.

While you are busy whipping up delicious dishes in the kitchen, it is also important to take time to remember safety. Cooking fires are the leading cause of home fires and home-fire-related injuries in the United States. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) reports “Cooking equipment was involved in almost half (48%) of all reported home fires...and tied with heating equipment for the second leading cause of home fire deaths.”

You can help ensure your holiday plans don’t go up in smoke by taking a few precautions! Staying in the kitchen while cooking and if you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol don’t use the stove or stove-top. Be alert!

SERVPRO of Franklin County wants you, your family, and your property to stay safe. If you do experience a fire or water damage during the holidays, or any time of the year, they can help you make it “Like it never even happened."

Kitchen Cautions

11/1/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Kitchen Cautions Safety in the kitchen

Each November, families gather to celebrate Thanksgiving by preparing a delicious feast, but if you don’t practice safe cooking habits, your holiday could become hazardous very quickly.

According to the National Fire Protection Association, cooking fires are the number one cause of home fires and home injuries. The leading cause of fires in the kitchen is unattended cooking. It’s important to be alert to prevent cooking fires.

  • Be on alert! If you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol don’t use the stove or stovetop.
  • Stay in the kitchen while you are frying, grilling, boiling, or broiling food.
  • If you are simmering, baking, or roasting food, check it regularly, remain in the kitchen while food is cooking, and use a timer to remind you that you are cooking.
  • Keep anything that can catch fire—oven mitts, wooden utensils, food packaging, towels, or curtains—away from the stovetop.


If you have a cooking fire, consider the following safety protocols to help keep you and your family safe.

  • Just get out! When you leave, close the door behind you to help contain the fire.
  • Call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number after you leave.
  • For an oven fire, turn off the heat and keep the door closed.
  • If you try to fight the fire, be sure others are getting out and you have a clear way out.
  • Keep a lid nearby when you’re cooking to smother small grease fires. Smother the fire by sliding the lid over the pan and turn off the stovetop. Leave the pan covered until it is completely cooled.


SERVPRO of Franklin County would like to wish you a safe and happy holiday season. 

Five Dangers of Deep Frying a Turkey

11/1/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Five Dangers of Deep Frying a Turkey Turkey Frying Dangers

A deep-fried turkey: delicious, but worth it? If you’ve seen any of the numerous videos of turkey fryer explosions and fires online, you may have asked yourself this question before. Running the risk of bodily injury or property damage is something to consider when menu planning this holiday season.


  • Turkey fryers can easily tip over, spilling hot cooking oil over a large area.
  • An overfilled cooking pot will cause cooking oil to spill when the turkey is put in, and a partially frozen turkey will cause cooking oil to splatter when put in the pot.
  • Even a small amount of cooking oil spilling on a hot burner can cause a large fire.
  • Without thermostat controls, deep fryers can overheat oil to the point of starting a fire.
  • The sides of the cooking pot, lid, and pot handles can get dangerously hot.

We want you, your family, and your property to stay safe. If you do experience a fire or water damage during the holidays, or any time of the year, they can help you make it “Like it never even happened.” 

Flood Damage Restoration Recommendations for Uninsured Losses

10/26/2017 (Permalink)

It is never too soon to start to consider what steps need to be taken especially when you don’t have adequate insurance for water damage.

The following recommendations assume a flooding situation with horizontally traveling Category 3 (unsanitary) water containing silt and other contaminants have infiltrated into homes and businesses to a depth of a few inches or feet and remained for multiple days.  When structures are completely submerged or remain substantially flooded for several weeks, more elaborate procedures may be required.

  1. Foremost, consider safety:
    1. Evacuatepotentially respiratory or immune-compromised, or non-essential persons (e.g., children, the elderly, pregnant women; those recovering from extended illness or surgery, or those on regimens of prescription drugs or chemotherapy). When medical questions arise, consult with public health professionals.
    2. Before entering a heavily flood-damaged structure, open windows and doors and air it out thoroughly. Ventilation must be maintained during and following the restoration effort. This reduces but does not eliminate, the potential for inhaling pathogenic (disease causing) microorganisms.  Also, allow as much sunlight into the structure as practical, since fresh air and ultraviolet light help inhibit microorganism growth.
    3. Consider the structural integrity of a damaged building before entering. Wear protective clothing, boots with steel or fiberglass shanks, and a hard hat.  Have the building checked by a qualified builder or structural engineer when in doubt.
    4. Ensure that electrical shock hazards have been eliminated. Consult a licensed and qualified electrician when questions arise.
    5. Protect yourself from pathogenic microorganisms.Wear protective gloves before handling contaminated materials.  Splash goggles should be worn to protect and prevent microorganism entry through the eyes.  A vapor respirator (paint respirator) should be worn to prevent inhalation of most microorganisms or spores.
  2. Remove quantities of debris(silt, vegetation, floating objects) with shovels, rakes or any safe means practical. Clean and sanitize all tools when complete.
  3. Remove and dispose of drywall (Sheetrock®), paneling or other wall materialsup to a point 15-24″ inches above the visible water line. If practical, stay within four feet of the floor to salvage as much wall material as practical since drywall is usually installed horizontally in 4’x8’ or 4’x12’ panels.
  4. Remove and dispose of insulation materialsexposed during wall removal. Look for evidence of moisture wicking up insulation materials.  Leave only materials that are durable, dry and minimally porous, and which can be cleaned and decontaminated with relative ease.
  5. Remove and dispose of carpet, cushion, pad, felt and sheet vinyl, or laminate flooring materials. Porous materials may absorb considerable quantities of water and contaminant, and non-porous materials may trap moisture to prolong drying.  The inevitable result will be rapid microbial growth, along with associated odor and potential health hazards.  Solid wood flooring should be removed since contaminants and moisture collect underneath in hollow areas between the wood and subfloor. The following procedures may require the assistance of a professional water-damage restorer, who has specialized biocides, and application and extraction equipment, if available.
  6. While maintaining ventilation and respiratory protection, liberally spray durable salvageable materials (e.g., studs, decking, joists) with appropriate biocides.Household chlorine bleach (e.g., Clorox®) mixed 1 part bleach to 11 parts water (½%) may be used on durable, colorfast surfaces.  Never mix chlorine bleach with ammonia or strong acids!
  7. Following application of properly diluted biocides, brush agitate all areasto remove visible soils and to encourage biocide penetration into cracks and crevices. Professional restorers use pressurized spraying to accomplish this step.
  8. When fresh water is restored within the structure, flush contaminants from salvageable surfaces with a water hose or pressure washer.Work from top to bottom and from walls to flooring.
  9. Wet vacuum or mop up excess rinse water from flooring materials immediately.Thoroughly flush all contamination from wall frames.  Pressure washing, if available, is specifically recommended to flush contaminants from hard-to-access areas, following contaminated water removal with industrial wet vacuuming equipment.
  10. Repeat steps 6-9 as necessary, until all surfaces are clean and contamination is physically removed.
  11. Lightly spray a final application of an approved non-chlorinated disinfectant to all salvageable surfaces.
  12. Dry structural components with plenty of air circulation, while maintaining constant ventilation (weather conditions permitting). If practical, take advantage of low outside humidity (check local weather reports).  Use oscillating or box fans, moving them around the structure every few hours.  Avoid temperature extremes that might slow drying or promote microorganism growth (68-86oF/20-30oC is ideal for growth).  Rent high-volume professional drying equipment (airmovers and dehumidifiers) if available, especially in areas where ventilation is not possible (sealed buildings, security issues).  All electrical components that were below the water line should be checked for operational safety by a qualified contractor.
  13. Leave cleaned structural surfaces exposed for several days or even weeks, or until you are sure that they have returned to within four percentage points of normal moisture content (generally the normal moisture content of structural wood is around 10%). Otherwise, subsequent structural damage and health hazards can result after wall and flooring materials have been replaced or painted.
  14. Durable, colorfast contents (e.g., washable clothing, dishes, glassware, furniture) might be salvageable if washed in warm detergent solutions. Common sense and caution should be used in determining contents salvageability.

Where financial resources permit, comprehensive restoration should be accomplished by trained, Institute of Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) Water Damage Restoration Technicians.  To prevent mold growth on structural materials, property owners should consider hiring a professional restorer to evaluate moisture levels in structural materials before reconstruction.

From initial and ongoing training at SERVPRO’s Corporate Training Facility to regular IICRC industry certifications, rest assured our staff is equipped with the knowledge to restore your property. Our training program includes the following:

  • IICRC Training
  • Employee Certification Training
  • Initial Franchise Training
  • e-Learnings

Please call us for more information regarding floor or water damage cleanup.

Choosing A Commercial Carpet Cleaner

10/26/2017 (Permalink)

Commercial Choosing A Commercial Carpet Cleaner Commercial Carpet Cleaning Franklin County

When it comes time to finally cleaning your office floors, the first step in achieving the best results is contacting a commercial carpet cleaner. These professionals carry a wide range of tools, as well as a wide range of experience that can be invaluable when it comes to treating flooring, something that can suffer permanent damage if done incorrectly.

Aside from these obvious differences, hiring a reputable company that has undergone extensive training will shed some light on the quality of the work that will be done. For instance, vacuuming an area, especially problematic spots, prior to the actual treatment is crucial in eliminating physical residue that may have collected on the surface. This is why it’s important to not only find a well-equipped professional, but one with the experience necessary to wield these tools properly.

Some of the tools that professionals use are much pricier than any rental machines that may be available for an individual to rent or purchase. These machines typically have a much greater suction power, as well as advanced agents that are more efficient than traditional soaps.

When it comes down to time, we know you don’t have time to worry about the common wear and tear that gradually soils your office. Our highly trained technicians use top-of-the-line equipment to make your business shine again.

When grime, odor, and moisture challenges go beyond the scope of your regular janitorial staff, you should call SERVPRO of Franklin County for prompt service. Whether it’s removing an odor problem or deep cleaning flooring or carpets, you can rely on us to make your workspace look its very best.

Have Questions? Call Today – (636) 583-5200

Searching For A Fire And Flood Restoration Service

10/26/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Searching For A Fire And Flood Restoration Service Fire and water damage restoration

Fire and flood restoration is an arduous process that is best done with the help of professionals, as it is often difficult to understand the aftermath these elements cause. Sadly, the cruelest cut stemming from these disasters usually happens once the shock of the tragedy has subsided, and can claim many other belongings if the lingering effects are not dealt with promptly.

Once the flame has been extinguished, the ash left behind begins to deteriorate things further.  Within hours the acidic nature of ash will discolor plastics and metals, and once several days and weeks have gone by, metals and glass will be corroded or etched beyond repair. This means that appliances, windows and piping will all need to be ripped out and replaced, multiplying the financial costs of the disaster. Wood furniture is also affected at this point, so it is conceivable that nearly everything will need to be replaced if action isn’t taken rather quickly.

It’s hard to imagine, but water damage can be even worse. If fire and flood restoration is not done in a hurry, soaked materials will need to be discarded. Carpeting and the padding under it, insulation, clothing, bedding and important papers will all need to be thrown away if they come in contact with contaminated water. Most people are familiar with the molds that rising waters bring, but fungi, bacteria and parasites are other major hazards that have to be contended with, and once they are allowed to hang around and multiply, they can be nearly impossible to destroy. Because of this, it is best to enlist SERVPRO professionals to handle the clean-up and return the property and personal belongings to their former glory.

Fire damage can be devastating for you and your family. Feelings of confusion and stress are common, and you need a caring expert to guide you through this crisis. We always treat your family with the greatest empathy and respect, and we’ll treat your property with great care.

Please refer to our Fire Damage Tips - Until Help Arrives Guide and follow these tips to protect yourself and your property.

Have Questions? Call Us Today – (636) 583-5200

Have A Professional Handle The Process Of Fire Restoration

10/25/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Have A Professional Handle The Process Of Fire Restoration Washington, MO Fire Loss

The process of fire restoration can be very involved. Private homeowners and companies can oftentimes be devastated by the damage caused by this kind of event.  One aspect that gives peace of mind involves knowing when the right professional has been hired. That is one of the reasons why it is important to hire a firm that is associated with the Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification.

SERVPRO of Franklin County is an IICRC Certified Firm, and our employees are trained in handling fire damage restoration. Serving Franklin County, MO areas such as: Union, Washington, Pacific, St. Clair and Sullivan Missouri.

The first step in the process is to clean up as much of the existing area as possible. If the area is not immediately cleaned, soot residue and permanent damage can be left behind.  When cleaning, always use dust masks and open the area for proper ventilation.  Clean from the ceilings to the floors and vacuum all floors and upholstery.  Wash any items that are able to be laundered. Clean the outside with a pressure washer if available. 

If immediate cleanup is not done, it can lead to devastating effects. Within minutes of fire and smoke damage, appliances and many items will discolor to a yellow hue. After a few hours, acid will stain bathrooms and many other areas of the home or business. Within days, walls will discolor permanently and items will begin to rust due to the acid residue. Finally, after weeks the cost of clean-up will become substantially more expensive. The building and furnishings can be permanently damaged by the acid left behind.  Soot residue will be layered throughout the home or business.  For these reasons, it is vital to contact a professional associated with the Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification to utilize fire restoration techniques in an effort to return the home or business to a preloss state.  One company or service provider should be able to handle the damage.  The seal of Certification by the Institute should be shown on any provider;s website. This shows the customer the reliability and the expertise of the service provider.

Residue and smoky odors need to be removed immediately. Professionals will use the process of fire restoration to achieve satisfactory results.  These providers will remove the source of the odor, clean any items that can be salvaged, get rid of any lingering odor with an odor counteractant and deodorizing fog.  Finally, the provider will seal salvageable items to encapsulate odor and prevent further recontamination.

Homeowners and businesses that are educated in the fire restoration process are able to minimize the cost of repair.  Professionals can be contacted in a timely manner to return the area to a preloss state. By hiring the right professionals the victims can have some peace of mind during a very stressful time.

Give SERVPRO a call today, we are "Here to Help"! 636-583-5200

Source: http://www.IICRC.org/have-professional-handle-the-process-fire-restoration-a-4.html

Drive safely as it gets darker

10/20/2017 (Permalink)

General Drive safely as it gets darker Take Extra Care on the Road

Daylight Saving Time ends every year on the first Sunday in November. This means it starts to get darker earlier. As we set our clocks backward by one hour in most areas of the country, here are some tips for driving at night.

As we 'Fall Back' to Shorter Days, Take Extra Care on the Road

Fatigue, lack of light, compromised night vision, rush hour and impaired drivers all contribute to making driving at night more dangerous than during any other time of day. In fact, the risk of a fatal crash is three times greater at night, according to National Safety Council research.

Fatigue

A National Sleep Foundation poll says 60% of adults have driven while they were tired, and another 37%, or 103 million people, have fallen asleep at the wheel. Of those, 13% say they fall asleep while driving at least once a month, and 4% say they have caused a crash by falling asleep while driving.

The reasons are many – shift work, lack of quality sleep, long work hours, sleep disorders – and it doesn't only happen on lengthy trips.

These staggering numbers are backed up by a report by NHTSA that 100,000 police-reported crashes are a result of driver fatigue. Most crashes or near-misses happen at the times you would expect drivers to be tired: 4 to 6 a.m., midnight to 2 a.m. and 2 to 4 p.m., according to NSF.

Nov. 6-13, 2016, is Drowsy Driving Prevention Week. The National Sleep Foundation offers this advice:

  • Get seven to nine hours of sleep a night
  • Don't drive if you've been awake for 24 hours or more
  • Stop every two hours to rest
  • Pull over and take a nap if you're drowsy
  • Travel during times you are normally awake

Darkness

When Daylight Saving Time ends many people will find themselves spending more time driving in the dark. Depth perception, color recognition and peripheral vision can be compromised in the dark, and the glare of headlights from an oncoming vehicle can temporarily blind a driver.

Even with high-beam headlights on, visibility is limited to about 500 feet (250 feet for normal headlights) creating less time to react to something in the road, especially when driving at higher speeds.

What should you do to combat darkness?

  • Aim your headlights correctly, and make sure they're clean
  • Dim your dashboard
  • Look away from oncoming lights
  • If you wear glasses, make sure they're anti-reflective
  • Clean the windshield to eliminate streaks
  • Slow down to compensate for limited visibility and reduced stopping time

Compromised Night Vision

Night vision is the ability to see well in low-light conditions. As we age, we have greater difficulty seeing at night. A 50-year-old driver may need twice as much light to see as well as a 30-year-old. At age 60 and older, driving can become even more difficult, according to the American Optometric Association. Some older drivers also may have compromised vision due to cataracts and degenerative eye diseases.

The AOA recommends older drivers:

  • Have annual vision exams
  • Reduce speed
  • Take a driving course; even experienced drivers can benefit from a refresher course, and some of the rules have probably changed
  • Minimize distractions, like talking with passengers or listening to the radio
  • Check with your doctor about side effects of prescription drugs
  • Limit driving to daytime hours if necessary

Rush Hour

Evening rush hour (between 4 and 7 p.m. weekdays) is a dangerous time to drive due to crowded roadways and drivers eager to get home after work. In winter, it's dark during rush hour, compounding an already dangerous driving situation.

How can you make it home safely during rush hour?

  • Don't be an impatient driver; slow down
  • Stay in your lane and beware of drivers who dart from lane to lane
  • Even though the route may be familiar, don't go on autopilot; stay alert
  • In unfamiliar areas, consult a map before you go and memorize your route
  • Don't touch your phone, eat, drink or do other things that are distracting

Impaired Drivers

Nearly 30 people die every day in crashes that involve a driver impaired by alcohol, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Drivers impaired by prescription medicines and other drugs increase that number significantly. Impaired drivers are most frequently on the road after dark – particularly between the hours of midnight and 3 a.m. on weekends.

While drunk driving has declined by about one-third since 2007, the number of drivers under the influence of drugs has increased. Between 2013 and 2014, 22% of drivers tested positive for a drug that would cause impairment, according to a roadside survey conducted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. NHTSA also found that the prevalence of THC (found in marijuana) among drivers on weekend nights increased 48% since 2007, from 8.6% of drivers to 12.6%. Many states have not yet updated their impaired driving laws to address this growing problem.

Stay Alert, Stay Alive

While we do only one quarter of our driving at night, 50% of traffic deaths happen at night. It doesn't matter whether the road is familiar or not, driving at night is always more dangerous.

More than 35,500 people were killed in car crashes in 2013, according to Injury Facts 2016. By taking some extra precautions, we can all contribute to reducing these numbers.

Source: http://www.nsc.org/learn/safety-knowledge/Pages/news-and-resources-driving-at-night.aspx